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Civil Society Workshop, September 26: Civil Society Snapshots from Latvia, China, France with Senior Fellows 2019

Join us on Thursday, September 26, at 12:30 pm, for a discussion with

Senior International Fellows 2019:

Inese Danga, Social Support Program Director — Foundation Ziedot.lv
Delphine Valette, Community Development Manager for Nice-Côte d’Azur Area; and Consultant for entrepreneurs and community leaders
Coordinator, Community Foundations Group — National Centre for French Foundations
Tongting Xiao, Secretary — Chengdu Wuhou Community Development Foundation

Civil Society Snapshots from Latvia, China, France

Room: TBC

Civil Society Workshop, October 10: “Nonprofit Downhill Skiing in Maine: Analysis of a Mixed Industry” with John Casey

The Civil Society Workshop will meet on Thursday, October 10 at 12:30 pm for a discussion with

Prof. John Casey, 

Marxe School of Public and International Affairs

Baruch College, CUNY

“Nonprofit Downhill Skiing in Maine: Analysis of a Mixed Industry”

Abstract. This paper focuses on the shifting landscapes of collaborations in mixed industries, and the decisions made around the provision of services through the public, private or nonprofit sectors. The paper analyses the history of the involvement of the three sectors in the provision of downhill skiing as a mixed industry in Maine, USA, and explores the implications for the future of public service.

To most people, skiing conjures up images of the glitterati schussing down the slopes of high-end resorts. At first sight, it seems to be a quintessentially private service that is offered at a premium by for-profit businesses. Yet, in Maine, of the 19 currently operating downhill ski areas, 11 are owned or operated by 501c3 nonprofits, (3 of the ski areas are owned by the local towns but operated by nonprofit organizations), in effect providing a public service. Throughout the US there are ski areas owned and operated by governments and nonprofits, but NAICS statistics indicate that Maine has the highest proportion. This paper analyzes what this market niche tells us about the collaboration between sectors in mixed industries, and explores the implications for the future of public service.

Room: TBC

A: Fall 2019 Schedule

Meets on Thursdays from 12:30 – 2:00 pm at the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society, room 5401, unless otherwise indicated.

Fall 2019 Schedule

 

DATE SPEAKER TITLE
  September 12  Senior International Fellows 2019    Civil Society Snapshots from Ukraine, Italy, Nigeria
  September 26  Senior International Fellows 2019    Civil Society Snapshots from Latvia, China, France
  October 10  John Casey   Nonprofit Downhill Skiing in Maine: Analysis of a Mixed Industry
  October 24  Varnica Arora  Women Centered Philanthropy and Questions of Masculinities
  November 7 Anna Zhelnina  TBC
  November 21  David Monda
 Civil society, immigration and xenophobia in Johannesburg, South Africa
  December 5  Merrill Sovner  Reduce, Replace, or Reorient: NGO Responses to the End of International Funding

 

Civil Society Workshop, May 9: Jessica Mahlbacher, “The Ties that Bind?: International Linkages and the Hong Kong Democracy Movement.”

Join us on Thursday, May 9, at 12:30 pm for a discussion with:

Jessica Mahlbacher, PhD Candidate, Political Science

The Ties that Bind?: International Linkages and the Hong Kong Democracy Movement.”

Recent literature has highlighted the importance of international linkages to democratization struggles in empowering opposition groups. As a former British colony, Hong Kong has many international linkages, including a large diaspora, leaders educated in Western universities, and numerous international trade and financial ties. Yet these linkages have varied in their impact on the relationship between rival factions and the local government. While Hong Kong activists were able to elicit international government support for the Article 23 Movement against treason and sedition legislation in 2003, they were unable to get similar support for Umbrella Movement in 2014. Building on fieldwork and archival research conducted from 2016 and 2018, my research maintains that contrary to Levitsky and Way’s argument, the effect of linkages depends on the international context and composition of movement leadership.

Room: TBA

Greg Witkowski, March 28: Developing a Global Approach to Philanthropy

Join us on Thursday, March 28, at 12:30 pm for a discussion with:

Greg Witkowski, Senior Lecturer in the Nonprofit Management Program, Columbia University

Developing a Global Approach to Philanthropy

This session will help flesh out an inclusive definition of philanthropy. Previous definitions have focused on Western expectations of formal philanthropy rather than the expressions of charity, solidarity and reciprocal giving that exist around the world. The workshop will present a overview of philanthropic giving, its instruments and goals in the West in an effort to find places to broaden perspectives to include views from Asia, Africa, and Latin America construct a more inclusive view.

Room: Sociology Thesis Room, 6112.1

Hong Hoang: Social Change under Government Supervision in Vietnam, February 28

Join us on Thursday, February 28, at 12:30 pm for a discussion with:

Hong Hoang, Obama Scholar, Founder and Executive Director of CHANGE

Social Change under Government Supervision in Vietnam

Vietnam is a one party-state that faces many environmental and social challenges. Civil society organizations are poised to help these challenges while they operate under close government supervision. In this presentation, Hong Hoang will share the experience of CHANGE, a CSO that activates youth, communities and the public on issues of climate and energy, wildlife conservation and sustainability. She will discuss the process of establishing CHANGE as a legal organization as well as how it mobilizes resources, implements its mission, and navigates the parameters set by the Vietnamese government.

We will be meeting at the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society, room 5401

Civil Society Workshop, April 11: “The Role of Pooled Funding in Supporting Civil Society in Eastern Europe”

Join us on Thursday, April 11, at 12:30 pm for a discussion with:

Merrill Sovner, Barry Gaberman, and Bill Moody

“The Role of Pooled Funding in Supporting Civil Society in Eastern Europe”

Abstract: Starting in 1991, US private foundations, sometimes joined by USAID, came together to pool their funding into a series of partnerships and trust with the overall aim of supporting civil society in Eastern Europe. Established during a time of optimism and consensus in liberal democracy, civil society was seen as an essential part of sustaining democratic change in the region after the end of Communist regimes. The Environmental Partnership for Central Europe, the Baltic-American Partnership Fund, the Trust for Civil Society in Central and Eastern Europe, the Balkans Trust for Democracy and the Black Sea Trust for Regional Cooperation were set up at different times, different countries, slightly different contexts, different yet overlapping funders, and different end points. They have been evaluated and assessed individually, but this effort aims to look across all five to glean a greater understanding of this model, and over a long term. What enduring legacy have these pooled funds left in the region today, where the liberal democratic consensus can no longer be taken for granted? This research project, undertaken by three former foundation staff, aims to develop a list of lessons for the philanthropic field in considering pooled funding for civil society development going forward.

Presenters:

Barry Gaberman is a retired Senior Vice President of the Ford Foundation, and has served as chair of the board of the Foundation Center, the Global Fund for Community Foundations, the WINGS Coordinating Committee and BoardSource.

William Moody is a retired Program Director of the Rockefeller Brothers Fund and author of the book, Staying the Course: Reflections on 40 Years of Grantmaking at the Rockefeller Brothers Fund.

Merrill Sovner is a former Deputy Program Director at the Open Society Foundations and a Ph.D. Candidate in Political Science at the CUNY Graduate Center.

Room: Sociology Thesis Room, 6th floor, 6112.1

Dennis Redeker, March 14: Digital Constitutionalism: Norm-Entrepreneurship of Transnational Advocacy Networks in the Internet Rights Field

Join us on Thursday, March 14, at 12:30 pm for a discussion with:

Dennis Redeker, PhD Fellow at the Bremen International Graduate School of Social Sciences (BIGSSS), University of Bremen, and International Graduate Researcher Visiting Scholar at the Center for European and Mediterranean Studies, New York University

Digital Constitutionalism: Norm-Entrepreneurship of Transnational Advocacy Networks in the Internet Rights Field

Dennis RedekerAbstract: As the Internet and digital technologies become ever more pervasive in our societies, the struggle around the norms governing the behavior of users, governments and corporations intensifies. Digital constitutionalism has been developed as a term that describes a conversation around fundamental rights and principles regarding the Internet. Initiatives of digital constitutionalism are often led by networks of civil society groups that act as norm entrepreneurs aiming to entrench a set of rights and principles into a transnational constitutional order. Documents of digital constitutionalism typically lay out demands for an array of individual norms, from net neutrality to freedom of expression online. The transnational advocacy networks (TANs) associated with these documents navigate different levels of engagement, from global Internet governance fora, such as the Internet Governance Forum, to divergent local contexts in which Internet related norms are at stake.
The talk sheds light on the emergence and development of three different transnational networks with a focus on the coalition around the “Feminist Principles of the Internet”. The focus of the presentation lies on the negotiation processes that lead to the manifestations of norms expressed in the documents of constitutionalism, the role these documents play in mobilizing TANs, and the use of these documents in the groups’ norm-entrepreneurship. The argument is based on a comparative case study methodology utilizing an analysis of around twenty qualitative interviews with civil society representatives from around the world and numerous written and digital materials.

Room: Political Science thesis room: 5200.07

Mark Sidel: New forms of control of civil society:  The application of a “social credit scoring” system to civil society organizations, nonprofits, and foundations in China

Join us on Thursday, February 14, at 12:30 pm for a discussion with:

Mark Sidel, Doyle-Bascom Professor of Law and Public Affairs, University of Wisconsin-Madison and Consultant (Asia), International Center for Not-for-Profit Law

New forms of control of civil society: The application of a “social credit scoring” system to civil society organizations, nonprofits, and foundations in China

Abstract: China is rapidly developing a system of quantitative and qualitative measurement of individuals and organizations in China that is intended to provide a measure of the trust that the Chinese Party and government have in each citizen and organization.  This is a massive national project, already underway for several years, and referred to as “social credit scoring” and the “social credit system” in China.  Individuals with scores below a certain threshold may be denied permission to travel within or outside the country; loans and credit; employment; and many other public benefits and privileges.  Now China is beginning the process of rolling out this “social credit scoring” system to the nonprofit sector (through rules that appeared in 2018), as another means (beyond an already extensive layer of regulation and state governance) to monitor and control civil society organizations.  This talk will outline the initial emergence of this monitoring system for the Chinese nonprofit sector, what we know so far, how it is likely to work, and what the implications may be for the civil society sector in China and perhaps beyond.

Room: Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society, room 5401

B: Spring 2019 Schedule

Meets on Thursdays from 12:30 – 2:00 pm at the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society, room 5401, unless otherwise indicated.

Spring 2019 Schedule

DATE SPEAKER TITLE
  February 14    Mark Sidel    New forms of control of civil society:  The application of a “social credit scoring” system to civil society organizations, nonprofits, and foundations in China
  February 28   Hong Hoang   Social Change under Government Supervision in Vietnam
  March 14    Dennis Redeker    Digital Constitutionalism: Norm-Entrepreneurship of Transnational Advocacy Networks in the Internet Rights Field
  March 28   Greg Witkowski   Developing a Global Approach to Philanthropy
  April 11   Merrill Sovner, Barry Gaberman, and Bill Moody   The Role of Pooled Funding in Supporting Civil Society in Eastern Europe
  April 25               Spring Break
  May 9  Jessica Mahlbacher The Ties that Bind?: International Linkages and the Hong Kong Democracy Movement

 

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